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Milk Lapsha

(by Dunya Ahrns)


(Russians cook for crowds. If you're not feeding 100 people, you'll have to get out your calculator.)

3 gal. milk

1 qt. half & half

2 to 3 lb. butter

12 to 15 sugar cubes

salt to taste

1 large chashka (an approximately 3-qt. stainless steel bowl) of lapsha noodles (to be found with your nearest Russian friend, or basically egg noodles), plus optional 3 handfuls

In a large double boiler with lid, pour in milk, half & half, butter (adjust the amount to the richness you desire), salt, and sugar cubes.

Raise heat to high but not boiling.

Add 1 full chashka of lapsha noodles, and stir occasionally—if too thin, then add the additional noodles.

(Milk lapsha is thick and not soupy.)

Simmer for about 1 hour, until noodles are distributed evenly (not all floating on top) and soup is thickened.

Turn off heat and let sit until ready to serve.


(Read Culture War, the story that accompanies this recipe.)

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