Search
  • Eat, Darling, Eat

Milk Lapsha

Updated: Apr 14, 2020

(by Dunya Ahrns)


Russians cook for crowds. If you're not feeding 100 people, you'll have to get out your calculator.)

3 gal. milk

1 qt. half & half

2 to 3 lb. butter

12 to 15 sugar cubes

salt to taste

1 large chashka (an approximately 3-qt. stainless steel bowl) of lapsha noodles (to be found with your nearest Russian friend, or basically egg noodles), plus optional 3 handfuls

In a large double boiler with lid, pour in milk, half & half, butter (adjust the amount to the richness you desire), salt, and sugar cubes.

Raise heat to high but not boiling.

Add 1 full chashka of lapsha noodles, and stir occasionally—if too thin, then add the additional noodles.

(Milk lapsha is thick and not soupy.)

Simmer for about 1 hour, until noodles are distributed evenly (not all floating on top) and soup is thickened.

Turn off heat and let sit until ready to serve.


Recent Posts

See All

Yorkshire Pudding

(by Patricia Fieldsteel) My mother’s Yorkshire pudding was from a recipe in the American housewives’ culinary bible, The Joy of Cooking, by Irma S. Rombauer. She made it in a rectangular, dented and l

Broiled Leftover Rib Roast Bones

(by Patricia Fieldsteel) 1 stick (1/4 lb.) melted sweet or salted butter 2 - 2 1/2 c. fresh bread crumbs fresh flat-leaf parsley or chives, chopped fine. optional: thinly sliced shallots and /or garli

Prime Rib Roast of Beef

(by Patricia Fieldsteel) My mother began cooking prime roast rib of beef after The New York Times Food Editor Craig Claiborne published a recipe for a “perfect” roast by author, editor, and food cons